ADJUDICATOR

RESOURCES

ADJ LINGO

CHAIR = The adjudicator that has casting vote, announces speakers, and delivers the OA (unless rolled)

MOTION = Another term for “topic”, the set focus of the debate

OA = "Oral adjudication", a brief speech delivered by the adjudicator that outlines who won and why

PANEL = When multiple adjudicators are sitting in to judge the debate, always composed of an uneven number

PANELLIST = An adjudicator who sits alongside the chair, has a vote, but does not manage the room

ROLLED = When a chair judge is out-voted by their panellists, being placed in the minority of the decision

SPEAKS or SPEAKER SCORE = The numbered score (from 70 to 80) given to a speaker for a given speech

SPLIT = When an adjudicator disagrees with the rest of the panel = split decision

TRAINEE = An adjudicator who does not have voting power, but is included in discussion

UNANIMOUS = When all adjudicators on the panel agree on the outcome of the debate = unanimous decision

WING = Another term for panellist adjudicators who sit beside the chair

GIVING A KILLER OA 101
THEME SEMINARS
THEMED MOTIONS

ACTOR = Somebody who enacts action or change

(PROUD TO) AFFIRM or PROPOSE = The affirmative team's role in the debate

ANALYSIS = Detailed discussion, argumentation, or dissection

AUTONOMY = Having independence, freedom from control, ability to make own decisions

BURDEN = The responsibility of a team in a debate, set by the topic or team

BURDEN PUSHING = When a team pressures their opposition to prove more than they are or what could reasonably be expected of them, can be used unfairly or strategically

CLASH = An area of disagreement in the debate, the extent to which arguments from different teams contradict and engage with each other

COMPARATIVE = To highlight differences between cases/worlds, or the suggestion of an alternative situation

COUNTERFACTUAL = The numbered score (from 70 to 80) given to a speaker for a given speech

DISCOURSE = Discussion, debates, or conversation in society

ECHO CHAMBERS = A situation where information/ideas/beliefs are amplified or reinforced by transmission
and repetition inside an “enclosed” system, where different views are disallowed

EXTENSION = A closing team requirement in BP debating which centers the team's case and distinguishes themselves from their opening and other speakers in the debate

HEAVY-LIFTING = A speaker takes the opposition at their best to the point of explaining the point of what they were trying to say

IMPACT = Having an effect on something, to "impact" is to emphasise the adjudicator how something might have a significant harm or benefit

INCENTIVE = Providing a reason to do something

MANDATE = Having a vested authority or duty to do something e.g. the government having a mandate to best represent the people because the population has given them authority through an election 

MECHANISM = A way to make change or action happen, broken down into components

NARRATIVES = Representations or constructions about people and issues 

(PROUD TO) NEGATE = The negative team's role in the debate

NUANCE = Providing complexity, not being single-faceted

PREP or PREP ROOM = The time when a team is working on their case for the debate

PRINCIPLE = Presented earliest in a team's case, this point is like a moral foundation to explain why something is morally right or justified, often dealing with rights or responsibilities e.g. bodily autonomy

REPLY SPEECH = A short speech that serves to give a "biased adjudication" in a format with specific rules and conventions. Replies do not exist in WADL's competitions, but do at an national/international level. READ MORE

SIGNPOSTING = e.g. "now for my first point," when speakers signal where they are in their speech

SPLIT or CASE SPLIT = How a team divides their points across speakers

SQUIRREL = Defining the motion in a strange or narrow way that could not have been reasonably expected by the other team, damaging the debate and making a good clash difficult

STAKEHOLDERS = People who should be considered or will be affected. The economy or environment is NOT a stakeholder because that is not a person or people. 

STATUS QUO = The current world, or the way things are at the current moment

SUBSTANTIVE = Material of speech which is not rebuttal i.e. argumentation/points introduced by speaker

SWING = To debate against students. Swinging should be a valuable learning experience for the students. Debate at a slightly more advanced level than the team to challenge them. Note: This should look like debating WELL rather than resorting to cheap shots or trying to stomp the school children.

WASH = When the impact of an issue is equally felt on both sides of the debate

WHIP or WHIPPING MATERIAL = When a speaker (generally a 3rd or 2nd) reminds the adjudicator of points that have been made by an earlier speaker on their team to strengthen their case and position in the debate e.g. "we told you clearly at ______ that..."

WORLD = Describing a set of circumstances or make-up of society/the world, used to be comparative

3v3 format
British Parliamentary (BP) format
1A
2A
3A
1N
2N
3N
Looking for the shortened ways to refer to speaker positions?
OG
CG
PM
DPM
GM
GW
LO
DLO
OM
OW
OO
CO
THE 3MS: A REFRESHER
Eye contact
Gestures
Pitch and pace
Humour
Volume
MANNER
Arguments
Rebuttal
Logic
Ideas
Examples
MATTER
Responsiveness
Structure
Speaking time
Role fulfilment
Prioritisation
METHOD